Best Paper Award Silver

Mrs. Obayori Olufunke Christianah

Abstract

The aims of this paper was to review a theoretical model useful for developing nursing knowledge in relation to nurse–patient interactions, Nurses are favorably viewed by the society, most often as virtuous , benevolent, angelic and admirable. Nurses have been stereotyped positively as ‘ministering angels’. This positive view of the profession is frequently experienced first-hand in the clinical practice.

The interaction between a nurse and the patient is in about four phases as defined by Peplau this includes- Orientation, Identification, Exploitation and Resolution, although these phases are defined separately, there is a considerable level of overlap between them. Issues such as power, the socio-cultural context, and interpersonal competence are shown to be important in the quality of nurse– patient interactions and nurses need to take cognizance of these factors in their interactions with patients.

Method

A review of the literature on nurse–patient interaction was carried out to and areas for further studies identified.

The literature was reviewed from the following perspectives, (1) nurse communication within the nurse–patient interaction, (2) nurse– patient interaction, (3) patient perception of the nurse– patient interaction, and (4) patient care-seeking communication.

Theoretical model

Peplau’s theory of Psychodynamic nursing.

Results

Nurse–patient interaction is a central element of clinical nursing practice. This paper shows how Peplau’s model can be used as a theoretical framework for understanding nurse– patient communication.

Relevance to clinical practice

Issues such as power, the socio-cultural context, and interpersonal competence are important in the quality of nurse– patient interactions and nurses need to take cognizance of these factors in their interactions with patients.

Theme of Conference
Research, Technology and Innovation: The Bedrock for Global Development
Article Topic
Peplau's theory of Psychodynamic Nursing and the Nurse-Patient Interaction